Category: Banks


Emily Philips via MetLife

NEW YORK, Oct 31, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) — MetLife, Inc. MetLife announced today that it provided, through its real estate investments department, a $350 million, five year, fixed rate mortgage for the office condominium unit at the Bertelsmann Building, located at 1540 Broadway in Manhattan. MetLife, which provides loans on office, multi-family, industrial and retail properties, has a $40 billion* commercial mortgage portfolio.

"We are pleased to be providing financing for such a high quality asset as 1540 Broadway," said Robert Merck, senior managing director and head of real estate investments for MetLife. "We originate, underwrite and manage each investment with a long-term view, and we are well positioned to identify and complete attractive financing opportunities in top-tier markets such as New York."

The Bertelsmann Building is a 44-story, 907,000 square foot, Class A office building located in Times Square. The building is leased to several high quality tenants, including Viacom, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, Duane Morris LLP, and Yahoo!. The borrower is a joint venture between affiliates of Edge Fund Advisors and HSBC Alternative Investments.

In addition to providing financing for 1540 Broadway, MetLife was the lead lender on a $725 million loan for Boston Properties’ 59-story, 1.6 million square foot, Class A office tower and retail property located at 601 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. MetLife provided $375 million of the total $725 million loan, joining with Prudential Mortgage Capital Co. and New York Life.

Through its real estate investments department, MetLife oversees a well diversified real estate portfolio of approximately $60 billion*, which is one of the largest in the U.S. and consists of real estate equities, commercial mortgages and agricultural mortgages. MetLife is a global leader in real estate investment and real estate asset management, with a vast network of regional offices that keep in close contact with major real estate markets. For more information, visit http://www.metlife.com/realestate .

MetLife, Inc. is a leading global provider of insurance, annuities and employee benefit programs, serving 90 million customers in over 50 countries. Through its subsidiaries and affiliates, MetLife holds leading market positions in the United States, Japan, Latin America, Asia Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. For more information, visit http://www.metlife.com .

This press release may contain or incorporate by reference information that includes or is based upon forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements give expectations or forecasts of future events. These statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They use words such as "anticipate," "estimate," "expect," "project," "intend," "plan," "believe" and other words and terms of similar meaning in connection with a discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, prospective services or products, future performance or results of current and anticipated services or products, sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies such as legal proceedings, trends in operations and financial results.

Any or all forward-looking statements may turn out to be wrong. They can be affected by inaccurate assumptions or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties. Many such factors will be important in determining the actual future results of MetLife, Inc., its subsidiaries and affiliates. These statements are based on current expectations and the current economic environment. They involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. These statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties, and other factors that might cause such differences include the risks, uncertainties and other factors identified in MetLife, Inc.’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K (the "Annual Report") filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q filed by MetLife, Inc. with the SEC after the date of the Annual Report under the captions "Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Risk Factors", MetLife, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 1, 2011 and other filings MetLife, Inc. makes with the SEC. MetLife, Inc. does not undertake any obligation to publicly correct or update any forward-looking statement if we later become aware that such statement is not likely to be achieved. Please consult any further disclosures MetLife, Inc. makes on related subjects in reports to the SEC.

 

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Appraiser News Online

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation lowered its projections on estimated bank-failure losses in the coming years, the FDIC announced Oct. 11. Bank failures are now estimated to cost the Deposit Insurance Fund $19 billion through 2015 compared to the estimated $23 billion in losses in 2010 alone.

Acting FDIC Chairman Martin J. Gruenberg said the fund is on track to recover and will meet the goals established by Congress, including a requirement that the fund reserve ratio reach 1.35 percent by Sept. 30, 2020.

The Deposit Insurance Fund’s balance has climbed for six consecutive quarters following seven previous quarterly declines, reaching a balance of $3.9 billion in the second quarter of 2011. That’s an increase of nearly $25 billion from its negative balance of $20.9 billion at the close of 2009.

Responding to the FDIC’s announcement, Jim Chessen, chief economist at the American Bankers Association, noted in American Banker Oct. 16 that the data “reaffirms the fact that the banking industry is rapidly returning to health and the losses once expected were overstated.” Chessen reported that the FDIC had set aside $17.7 billion for bank-failure losses in 2011, twice what is estimated to actually be needed for the year.

The American Bankers Association reported that banks pay $13.5 billion in annual premiums to the FDIC, which is well above the yearly costs the agency expected over the next few years and showed that the fund is rebuilding much faster than anticipated.

 

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Evan Nemeroff, National Mortgage News

A whistleblower lawsuit filed by two mortgage brokers has been unsealed in Federal District Court in Atlanta claiming that 13 banks and mortgage companies have cheated veterans out of hundreds of millions of dollars.

According to the lawsuit, lenders allegedly hid illegal fees in veterans’ home mortgage refinancing transactions related to the Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loans program. This program was created to allow veterans to take advantage of low interest rates and protect them from paying excessive fees and charges in the refinancing transaction.

The lawsuit claims that the lenders repeatedly violated the rules of the IRRRL program by charging veterans unallowable fees and then deliberately concealing this information from the VA to obtain taxpayer-backed guarantees for the loans. The lenders also allegedly falsely certified to the VA, in writing, that they were not charging unallowable fees.

In the lawsuit, the brokers are claiming that the lenders have been fraudulently reporting on HUD-1 statement forms undisclosed attorneys fees and other unallowable fees on the line for the actual cost of title examination and title search. The lawsuit says that lenders are reportedly charging $525 to $1,200 for title examination and title search fees, when the total cost should only amount to $125 to $200.

Lenders are permitted to charge veterans for recording fees and taxes, fees for a credit report and other “reasonable and customary amounts,” according to VA rules, but cannot charge attorneys’ fees or settlement closing fees in refinancing transactions involving VA loans.

“The false statements and fraudulent conduct are blatant,” said Marlan Wilbanks, co-lead counsel in this whistleblower case. “The banks simply reduced the charges for unallowable fees to zero, and then added those fees in the spaces where allowable fees were to be shown. Veterans don’t know what the usual and customary charges for those allowable fees are, and the VA understandably relied upon the banks to comply with VA regulations, rather than digging into every loan transaction. The banks took advantage of that reliance to cheat veterans and taxpayers.”

Since 2001, the VA has guaranteed over 1.1 million IRRRL loans. According to the Office of Inspector General for the Department of Veterans Affairs, the nationwide default rate for IRRRLs is 18% or more, with approximately more than 100,000 loans going into default every year. Nearly half of the VA loans that default result in foreclosure proceedings, costing the VA about $22,000 for each loan and also massive damages for American taxpayers and veterans.

Under the False Claims Act, the lenders would be liable for all damages resulting from those fraudulently induced guarantees of IRRRL loans, as well as penalties of up to $11,000 for each violation of the act.

The defendants in this case include Wells Fargo, Countrywide Home Loans, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Mortgage Investors Corp., PNC Bank, First Tennessee Bank National Association, Irwin Mortgage Corp., SunTrust Mortgage, New Freedom Mortgage Corp., GMAC Mortgage and Citimortgage,

“This is a massive fraud on the American taxpayers and American veterans,” said James Butler Jr., co-lead counsel of the Atlanta law firm Butler, Wooten and Fryhofer. “Knowing they weren’t allowed to charge the fees, the banks and mortgage companies inflated allowable charges to hide these illegal without telling the veterans who were the borrowers or the VA they were doing so.”

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Housingwire.com

Some of the largest banks in the country may boost dividends and restart stock repurchase plans now that the Federal Reserve has completed its comprehensive capital analysis and review.

About two years ago, the central bank advised financial institutions "that safety and soundness considerations required that dividends be substantially reduced or eliminated."

On Friday, the Fed plans to discuss its review with banks that requested a capital action, and all 19 firms that were subject to the stress tests will get "more detailed assessments of their capital planning processes next month."

The mandates to boost capital levels included in Basel 3 and the new requirements in the sweeping Dodd-Frank financial reforms have "substantially clarified the regulatory environment in which these firms will be operating," the Fed said.

From the end of 2008 through 2010, common equity increased by more than $300 billion at the 19 largest U.S. bank holding companies, the Fed said. Allowing these banks to return capital to shareholders improves the entire sector and helps promote the firms long-term access to capital, according to the central bank. The Fed has advised firms to keep dividends to 30% or less of earnings in 2011.

Washington thinktank MF Global anticipates some large firms to act immediately on the Fed decision.

"We would expect most of those banks to make announcements in the coming hours and days," analysts at the Washington-based commodities and derivatives brokerage said.

Under the Fed’s stress tests, banks had to show the ability to maintain at least a 5% Tier 1 common ratio. The most-recent test wasn’t "as standardized" as the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program undertook in early 2009, and doesn’t appear to be as transparent.

"We hear many initial complaints about the black box nature of this stress test," MF Global said. "It is true that the Federal Reserve has provided less detail than in the 2009 test. Yet the Fed did disclose the key economic assumptions. So we believe there is more here than the first impression indicates."

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