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Relative yields on mortgage-backed securities that guide new loan rates have fallen to the lowest in five months as investors wager the Federal Reserve is on standby to expand its holdings if the U.S. economy or Europe’s debt crisis worsens.

Yields on Fannie Mae’s current-coupon, 30-year bonds ended last week at 94 basis points more than 10-year Treasuries, the narrowest since July 8, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The spread widened to 98 basis points yesterday after reaching 121 basis points, or 1.21 percentage points, on Nov. 24.

The Fed is already bolstering the market, adding "dollar roll" trades this month that lower financing costs for investors, after starting in October to recycle proceeds from past investments in housing-related debt to help real estate escape its worst slump since the 1930s. While a smaller share of economists predict the central bank will add to its $1 trillion of holdings as the U.S. grows, bond buyers may benefit regardless, said Dwight Asset Management Co.’s Paul Norris.

"Let’s say that something bad happens in Europe," said Norris, a senior money manager whose Burlington, Vermont-based firm oversees about $50 billion. "Initially mortgages may widen out a bit but what that would likely lead to is a really quick implementation of QE3," he said, referring to what would be the third round of Fed asset purchases called quantitative easing.

If the situation is reversed and "Europe gets its act together," benchmark interest rates would probably rise, benefiting mortgage-bonds spreads partly by reducing refinancing and the supply of new securities, Norris said.

Economists Forecast

While Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Janet Yellen, Governor Daniel Tarullo and Fed Bank of New York President William C. Dudley have signaled more mortgage-bond purchases are possible, economists say it’s growing less likely.

About 49 percent surveyed by Bloomberg News see the Fed announcing next year additional debt buying, down from more than two-thirds before the central bank’s November meeting. The Federal Open Market Committee meets today in Washington. Money managers are "overweight" on agency mortgage bonds by the most in at least two years, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Elsewhere in credit markets, Caterpillar Inc. sold $600 million of bonds after the cost to protect the debt of the world’s largest construction and mining-equipment maker rose to the highest level in more than two years. U.S. interest-rate swap spreads widened as Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings said Europe’s leaders did little last week to fix the region’s debt crisis. Blue Coat Systems Inc. sought $465 million in loans as prices fell for a fourth day.

Caterpillar Swaps

Bonds of Charlotte, North Carolina-based Bank of America Corp. were the most actively traded U.S. corporate securities by dealers yesterday, with 77 trades of $1 million or more, according to Trace, the bond-price reporting system of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

Caterpillar’s offering consisted of $400 million of 1.125 percent notes due in December 2014 that yield 85 basis points more than similar-maturity Treasuries and $200 million of two- year, floating-rate debt that pays 30 basis points more than the London interbank offered rate, Bloomberg data show.

Credit-default swaps on Peoria, Illinois-based Caterpillar’s debt traded yesterday at 149.3 basis points, the highest since July 2009 and up from 118.5 at the end of October, according to data provider CMA, which is owned by CME Group Inc. and compiles prices quoted by dealers in the privately- negotiated market.

Markit CDX Index

Benchmark gauges of company credit risk in U.S. and Europe rose after Moody’s said a European Union summit offered few new measures and doesn’t diminish the risk of credit downgrades on European nations. Fitch said a comprehensive solution hasn’t yet been offered and predicted a "significant economic downturn" in the region.

The Markit CDX North America Investment Grade Index, which investors use to hedge against losses on corporate debt or to speculate on creditworthiness, added 3.5 basis points to a mid- price of 125.4 in New York, according to data provider CMA. The gauge has climbed from 79 on Feb. 8.

The Markit iTraxx Europe Index of 125 companies with investment-grade ratings dropped 1.5 basis points to 184.25, according to JPMorgan at 11 a.m. in London.

Risk Gauges

The indexes typically rise as investor confidence deteriorates and fall as it improves. Credit-default swaps pay the buyer face value if a borrower fails to meet its obligations, less the value of the defaulted debt. A basis point equals $1,000 annually on a contract protecting $10 million of debt.

The difference between the two-year swap rate and the comparable-maturity Treasury note yield increased 1.54 basis points to 43.93 basis points, the widest since Dec. 2. The measure, which rises when investors favor government bonds, has expanded from 41.55 on Nov. 30.

The Standard & Poor’s/LSTA U.S. Leveraged Loan 100 index fell 0.3 cent to 90.39 cents on the dollar, the lowest level since Nov. 29. The measure, which tracks the 100 largest dollar- denominated first-lien leveraged loans, has declined from 90.83 on Dec. 6.

Blue Coat, a provider of web security solutions, is seeking funding to back its buyout by Thoma Bravo LLC. The financing will include a $415 million term loan and a $50 million revolving line of credit, according to a Dec. 9 regulatory filing. Investment bank Jefferies Group Inc. is arranging the financing for the Sunnyvale, California-based company.

Emerging Markets

Leveraged loans and high-yield bonds are rated below Baa3 by Moody’s and lower than BBB- by S&P.

In emerging markets, relative yields rose for a second day, up 1 basis point to 409 basis points as of 10:08 a.m. in Hong Kong, according to JPMorgan’s EMBI Global index. The measure has ranged this year from 259 on Jan. 5 to 496 on Oct. 4.

The Fed, which under QE1 bought $1.25 trillion of mortgage securities and $172 billion of other agency debt through March 2010, has purchased a net $56.1 billion since October to offset prepayments and maturities, Bloomberg data show. The acquisitions are focused on the $5.3 trillion market of home- loan bonds guaranteed by government-supported Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac or U.S.-owned Ginnie Mae.

Anticipation of more transactions may be boosting demand among private investors. About 64 percent of money managers surveyed by JPMorgan are "overweight" agency mortgage securities, or holding a greater percentage than found in benchmark indexes, the highest since at least mid-2009, according to a Dec. 9 report by the New York-based bank.

QE3 Potential

Because of the potential for QE3, government-backed mortgage securities "offer that rare beast: positive exposure to event risk," Guy LeBas, chief fixed-income strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott LLC in Philadelphia, wrote in a Dec. 7 report. He recommended the bonds over other debt "within the interest rate sphere," such as Treasuries, in his 2012 outlook.

Chairman Ben S. Bernanke and his fellow policy makers will start another QE program next quarter, 16 of the 21 primary dealers of U.S. government securities that trade with the central bank said in a Bloomberg News survey last month. The Fed may buy about $545 billion in home-loan debt, based on the median of the firms that provided estimates.

A majority of 51 percent of the 41 economists polled by Bloomberg from Dec. 7 through Dec. 9 said the central bank will refrain from QE3. That contrasts with a survey before the Fed’s November meeting that showed 69 percent forecasting the action. This month, 13 percent of the economists said they expect the move will be announced in January and 21 percent in March.

Jobless Rate Falls

The likelihood has fallen after the unemployment rate declined to 8.6 percent from 9.1 percent, U.S. manufacturing expanded at the fastest pace in 5 months and vehicle sales climbed to their highest level in over 2 years.

A program may include $700 billion of home-loan securities, Citigroup Inc. analysts said. That figure reflects how much would be needed to "tangibly influence" mortgage rates without disrupting functioning in the market, analysts Inger Daniels and Mayank Singhal wrote in the Dec. 9 report.

Tarullo, in an October speech, said additional mortgage- bond purchases should "move back up toward the top of the list of options" because "the aggregate-demand effect should be felt not just in new-home purchases, but also in the added purchasing power of existing homeowners who are able to refinance."

Dollar Rolls

Yellen said in a Nov. 29 speech that she sees "see a strong case for additional policies to foster more-rapid recovery in the housing sector." If the Fed opted to buy more bonds, "it might make sense" for much of those to consist of mortgage securities to boost the housing market, Dudley said Nov. 17.

During the week ended Dec. 7, the Fed engaged in $4.35 billion of paired purchases and sales of mortgage securities in different months for the first time since starting to reinvest in the market along with its "Operation Twist" for Treasuries.

Those so-called dollar rolls boosted mortgage bonds last week, JPMorgan analysts led by Matt Jozoff and Morgan Stanley analysts Vipul Jain, Janaki Rao and Zofia Koscielniak said. The implied cost of financing Fannie Mae 3.5 percent bonds, which had climbed in a few weeks from about 30 basis points to almost 50 basis points, retraced that advance, according to JPMorgan.

Financing Rates

"Although funding markets in MBS have not shown significant signs of stress, financing rates have gone up in tandem with other funding rates, especially around year-end, and the Fed action helps alleviate some of those pressures," the Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a Dec. 9 report.

With dollar rolls, an investor seeking to borrow money enters into contracts to sell mortgage securities in any month and then buy similar bonds the following month; a lender would undertake the opposite trades. Investors entering into transactions for other reasons may be on either side of the contracts.

The transactions will "facilitate the settlement of our outstanding MBS purchases," Jonathan Freed, a New York Fed spokesman, said in a Dec. 6 e-mailed statement.

The Fed’s use of the trades underscored the central bank’s commitment to supporting the market, Dwight Asset’s Norris said. "All of their speeches that I’ve read and all of the anecdotal evidence points to them being fully involved," he said.

While the central bank probably isn’t ready to announce additional mortgage-bond buying, it may provide new aid to the market if it details changes to its so-called communication strategy in a way that reduces expected interest-rate volatility, he added. Higher forecasted volatility damages investors by increasing doubt about when the debt will be repaid as projected homeowner refinancing fluctuates and by boosting hedging costs.

 

 

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By Elyse Cherry via Los Angeles Times

President Obama recently announced that the federal government will take steps to reduce interest rates on mortgages for some existing homeowners. Unfortunately, that won’t help millions of U.S. homeowners already in foreclosure and millions more about to join them.

The current foreclosure crisis is not due to poor choices by individual homeowners. Most people caught up in it fell prey to a national bubble and bad lending practices. These taxpayers – schoolteachers and medical technicians, salesclerks and mechanics, veterans and parents of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan – are often simply people who got in over their heads. They deserve a second chance.

One reason the mortgage industry hasn’t done more, its leaders say, is that it fears creating a "moral hazard" – the concept being that if homeowners in default are given too much help, other homeowners might be tempted to deliberately default in order get the same help. That hasn’t been the experience of Boston Community Capital, a 27-year-old nonprofit, community development finance institution I’ve led for 14 years.

As part of its Stabilizing Urban Neighborhoods initiative, Boston Community Capital has renegotiated many mortgages on foreclosed homes, and we’ve seen no evidence that doing so sets off a flood of voluntary defaults. We believe our model could be applied much more widely in this national crisis.

Foreclosure isn’t something a homeowner chooses if it can be avoided. Today, a good credit score is required for countless transactions, and foreclosure destroys a person’s credit score. In many states foreclosed homeowners can’t qualify for another mortgage for many years, nor can they easily rent houses, qualify for college and car loans, or even get some jobs.

Since 2009, Stabilizing Urban Neighborhoods has prevented the eviction of almost 150 Massachusetts households by securing reduced mortgage payments that line up with homeowners’ real incomes – rather than with the value set by a real estate bubble that burst long ago.

Our formula is straightforward. We negotiate with the lender’s representative to buy foreclosed homes at current, distressed market values – often 50 percent less than the amount paid by the homeowner. We then resell the homes to their current occupants with a new 30-year mortgage at a fixed interest rate of 6.375 percent (a rate that, although higher than the best loans available to people with excellent credit, is far lower than the rate that the high-risk clients we assist could get elsewhere – if they could get other loans at all).

We qualify our clients by closely analyzing their finances and employment situations. We work with local nonprofits to understand client histories. Even after accounting for reserves, emergency repairs and closing expenses, we are able to lower monthly housing expenses and the overall cost of a home loan to affordable levels. On average, homeowners pay about 40 percent less per month.

We require homeowners to share any future potential appreciation with our neighborhood nonprofit if the market rebounds, discouraging speculators and people who aren’t serious about keeping their homes from coming to us.

Our initiative cannot solve every foreclosure problem. Some would-be participants don’t have enough income to sustain even a sharply reduced mortgage payment. Some in the mortgage industry, citing moral hazard, refuse to sell us homes at their current values because we plan to keep foreclosed homeowners in the homes. At times, we have been outbid for a home we were trying to save, but we won’t spend more on a home if that would mean we would have to offer our borrowers new mortgages that were still too high for them to manage.

Our Stabilizing Urban Neighborhoods initiative is not a bailout or a charity. It is a sustainable model that can offer relief to a substantial percentage of homeowners in foreclosure and relieve mortgage industry gridlock. The Open Society Foundations and others have provided us planning funds to explore other locations across the country where our model might work. The approach is best suited to areas that have suffered substantial depreciation in housing prices, that have high levels of foreclosures, and that have trusted, long-standing community organizations interested in entering partnerships to administer the program. We estimate that our approach could help 1 in 5 homeowners whose homes have significantly dropped in market price, and who are either late in paying their mortgages or in foreclosure.

Renegotiating realistic mortgages that keep people in their homes helps homeowners and neighborhoods. It also helps the mortgage industry, which must come to grips with the fact that many of its borrowers can’t afford to continue to make payments on mortgages that were entered into during the bubble. Our strategy could work on a far grander scale – the kind of scale that, say, Bank of America, Citigroup, HSBC or Wells Fargo or others could adopt.

Foreclosure and eviction are lengthy and expensive. As more homes become owned by lenders, those institutions will bear increasing responsibility for paying local property taxes, insurance and maintenance costs, as well as steep fines if they fail to comply with local building codes and city ordinances.

The groundless fear that helping some borrowers will lead to an avalanche of new foreclosures has discouraged sensible and systemic solutions to the foreclosure crisis. Allowing the mortgage industry to hide behind this fiction has created a genuine hazard – to neighborhoods, to communities and to the nation’s economic health.

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Brian McKay via Monitor Bank Rates

Mortgage rates are barely changed this week over last. Today’s mortgage rates on 30 year mortgage loans are averaging 4.13%, a slight increase from last week’s average 30 year mortgage rate of 4.11%. Average mortgage rates on 15 year mortgages are higher this week averaging 3.42%, an increase from last week’s average 15 year mortgage rate of 3.39%.

Compare current mortgage rates from several lenders by using our rate tables here: Current Mortgage Rates . Unlike most websites, no personal information is needed to view a list of mortgage rates.

30 year jumbo mortgage rates are averaging 4.61%, up from last week’s average 30 year jumbo mortgage rate of 4.55%. 15 year jumbo mortgage rates are averaging 3.89%, down from last week’s average 15 year jumbo mortgage rate of 4.90%.

Mortgage Rates

Conforming Adjustable Loans – Today’s Mortgage Rates

1 year adjustable mortgage rates today are averaging 3.79%, up from last week’s average 1 year adjustable jumbo mortgage rate of 3.77%.

3 year adjustable mortgage rates today are averaging 2.60%, down from last week’s average 3 year adjustable mortgage rate of 2.74%.

5 year adjustable mortgage rates are averaging 2.78%, a decrease from the prior week’s average 5 year adjustable rate of 2.82%.

Current 7 year adjustable mortgage rates are averaging 3.12%, no changed from the previous week’s average 7 year adjustable mortgage rate.

10 year adjustable mortgage rates currently are averaging 3.60%, unchanged from last week’s average 10 year adjustable rate.

Adjustable Jumbo Loans – Mortgage Rates Today

Current 1 year jumbo adjustable mortgage rates are averaging 4.50%, up from last week’s average adjustable jumbo mortgage rate of 4.05%.

3 year adjustable jumbo rates today are averaging lower at 3.42%, down from last week’s average 3 year jumbo adjustable rate of 3.49%.

5 year adjustable jumbo mortgage rates and refinance rates currently are averaging 3.03%, up from last week’s average jumbo adjustable rate of 3.02%.

7 year jumbo adjustable mortgage rates and refinance rates today are averaging 3.57%, unchanged from last week’s average 7 year adjustable home loan rate.

10 year jumbo loan rates and ‘refi’ rates are averaging 3.97%, up from the prior week’s average 10 year jumbo home mortgage loan rate of 3.96%.

Conforming Interest Only Adjustable Loans – Current Mortgage Rates

3 year interest only adjustable mortgage loan rates and refinancing rates are averaging 2.85%, down from last week’s average interest only mortgage loan rate of 3.15%.

5 year IO adjustable loan mortgage rates and mortgage refinance rates are averaging 2.93%, down from last week’s average five year interest only mortgage rate of 3.18%.

7 year interest only adjustable mortgage rates and refinance rates are averaging 3.44%, down from last week’s average 7 year interest-only mortgage interest rate of 3.54%.

Interest Only Jumbo Loans – Today’s Mortgage Rates

Today’s 3 year jumbo interest only adjustable loan rates are averaging 3.58%, down from last week’s average jumbo adjustable interest only rate of 3.67%

Current 5 year adjustable jumbo interest only rates are averaging 3.43%, a decrease from last week’s average IO home mortgage interest rate of 3.44%.

Today’s 7 year jumbo interest only adjustable rates are averaging 3.79%, unchanged from last week’s average jumbo 7 year home mortgage loan rate.

Home Equity Loan Rates – Today’s Home Equity Rates

10 year home equity loan rates are averaging 6.45%, unchanged from last week’s average home equity loan rate.

15 year home equity rates are averaging 6.41%, no change from last week’s average home equity loan rate.

Home Equity Line of Credit – Current HELOC Rates

Home equity line of credit rates currently are averaging 4.81%, unchanged last week’s average rate HELOC rate

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Emily Philips via MetLife

NEW YORK, Oct 31, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) — MetLife, Inc. MetLife announced today that it provided, through its real estate investments department, a $350 million, five year, fixed rate mortgage for the office condominium unit at the Bertelsmann Building, located at 1540 Broadway in Manhattan. MetLife, which provides loans on office, multi-family, industrial and retail properties, has a $40 billion* commercial mortgage portfolio.

"We are pleased to be providing financing for such a high quality asset as 1540 Broadway," said Robert Merck, senior managing director and head of real estate investments for MetLife. "We originate, underwrite and manage each investment with a long-term view, and we are well positioned to identify and complete attractive financing opportunities in top-tier markets such as New York."

The Bertelsmann Building is a 44-story, 907,000 square foot, Class A office building located in Times Square. The building is leased to several high quality tenants, including Viacom, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, Duane Morris LLP, and Yahoo!. The borrower is a joint venture between affiliates of Edge Fund Advisors and HSBC Alternative Investments.

In addition to providing financing for 1540 Broadway, MetLife was the lead lender on a $725 million loan for Boston Properties’ 59-story, 1.6 million square foot, Class A office tower and retail property located at 601 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. MetLife provided $375 million of the total $725 million loan, joining with Prudential Mortgage Capital Co. and New York Life.

Through its real estate investments department, MetLife oversees a well diversified real estate portfolio of approximately $60 billion*, which is one of the largest in the U.S. and consists of real estate equities, commercial mortgages and agricultural mortgages. MetLife is a global leader in real estate investment and real estate asset management, with a vast network of regional offices that keep in close contact with major real estate markets. For more information, visit http://www.metlife.com/realestate .

MetLife, Inc. is a leading global provider of insurance, annuities and employee benefit programs, serving 90 million customers in over 50 countries. Through its subsidiaries and affiliates, MetLife holds leading market positions in the United States, Japan, Latin America, Asia Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. For more information, visit http://www.metlife.com .

This press release may contain or incorporate by reference information that includes or is based upon forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements give expectations or forecasts of future events. These statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They use words such as "anticipate," "estimate," "expect," "project," "intend," "plan," "believe" and other words and terms of similar meaning in connection with a discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, prospective services or products, future performance or results of current and anticipated services or products, sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies such as legal proceedings, trends in operations and financial results.

Any or all forward-looking statements may turn out to be wrong. They can be affected by inaccurate assumptions or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties. Many such factors will be important in determining the actual future results of MetLife, Inc., its subsidiaries and affiliates. These statements are based on current expectations and the current economic environment. They involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. These statements are not guarantees of future performance. Actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties, and other factors that might cause such differences include the risks, uncertainties and other factors identified in MetLife, Inc.’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K (the "Annual Report") filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q filed by MetLife, Inc. with the SEC after the date of the Annual Report under the captions "Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" and "Risk Factors", MetLife, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 1, 2011 and other filings MetLife, Inc. makes with the SEC. MetLife, Inc. does not undertake any obligation to publicly correct or update any forward-looking statement if we later become aware that such statement is not likely to be achieved. Please consult any further disclosures MetLife, Inc. makes on related subjects in reports to the SEC.

 

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Appraiser News Online

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation lowered its projections on estimated bank-failure losses in the coming years, the FDIC announced Oct. 11. Bank failures are now estimated to cost the Deposit Insurance Fund $19 billion through 2015 compared to the estimated $23 billion in losses in 2010 alone.

Acting FDIC Chairman Martin J. Gruenberg said the fund is on track to recover and will meet the goals established by Congress, including a requirement that the fund reserve ratio reach 1.35 percent by Sept. 30, 2020.

The Deposit Insurance Fund’s balance has climbed for six consecutive quarters following seven previous quarterly declines, reaching a balance of $3.9 billion in the second quarter of 2011. That’s an increase of nearly $25 billion from its negative balance of $20.9 billion at the close of 2009.

Responding to the FDIC’s announcement, Jim Chessen, chief economist at the American Bankers Association, noted in American Banker Oct. 16 that the data “reaffirms the fact that the banking industry is rapidly returning to health and the losses once expected were overstated.” Chessen reported that the FDIC had set aside $17.7 billion for bank-failure losses in 2011, twice what is estimated to actually be needed for the year.

The American Bankers Association reported that banks pay $13.5 billion in annual premiums to the FDIC, which is well above the yearly costs the agency expected over the next few years and showed that the fund is rebuilding much faster than anticipated.

 

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